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User Generated Content

Posted in Amazon, Business Intelligence, Data, Data Mining by Pankaj Gudimella on March 27, 2009

Dave Winer says

The thing I like best about shopping at Amazon are the user comments. They really are good. And I often base purchasing decisions on what the other users say. It got so bad that when I went shopping at Fry’s for some sound equipment I fumbled around until I realized what I was missing was the advice of other shoppers. I did the unfair thing, listened to a bunch of stuff and then went home and bought what I liked and what the others liked, from Amazon.

The gold mine of data Amazon is collecting from its user’s via their reviews has been increasing their bottom line for years’ now. Amazon is very prudent in how it uses this data and provides it to the customer.

Facebook is the other company that is sitting on such a gold mine and will unleash its true potential soon. Here is a piece from Scoble about facebook and Zuckerberg and the phase the business is in.

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Linked Data

Posted in Data by Pankaj Gudimella on March 13, 2009

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Source:Linked Data

Petabytes of data is generated every hour on the planet. There are many different methods to analyze this data. One better way is to break the silos and link the data across the silos/channels/enterprises/countries. Many diamonds can be dug from this data mine. It is just a matter of time and this might be next big thing.

Data sets from Amazon

Posted in Amazon, Business Intelligence, Data by Pankaj Gudimella on February 25, 2009

Amazon announced four new data sets available to the public yesterday. You can find more on this here at the Amazon Web Services Blog.

It would be interesting to know the findings/insights from the developers who would work with these data sets.

SuperNap – The largest data center ever!

Posted in Data by Pankaj Gudimella on May 29, 2008

Drive a couple of blocks past the Loose Caboose and the Carburetor Shop on E. Sahara Avenue in Las Vegas, and you’ll find one of the world’s leading technology companies. The name of the company – Switch Communications – will go unrecognized by almost all of you. That’s because it has operated in near total secrecy for the last few years. Switch has preferred to keep its gold mine a need-to-know type of affair. “Pay no attention to the secure fortress in the strip mall.”

A few months ago, word of Switch’s apparently fantastic operations started to reach my in-box. Most of the people who visited the Switch facility were bound by non-disclosure agreements, but that failed to stop them from leaking out a few choice details. “This is the most advanced computing center in the world,” I was told. “It’s like the internet superhighway wrapped up in one package. All the heavies are there.”

Ever a cynic, I struggled to match these claims with the total lack of public information available on Switch. Companies fall all over themselves to issue press releases about things as a minor as cost-savings achieved by changing toilet paper suppliers. If a technology giant really existed in Las Vegas of all places, then it should be patting itself on the back and then letting city officials finish off the job with celebrations of their own.

As Switch’s CEO Rob Roy tells it, however, the company had good reason to avoid publicity.

Legend has it that the company managed to acquire what was once meant to be Enron’s broadband trading hub for a song. This gave Switch access to more than twenty of the primary carrier backbones in a single location. Switch tied this vast network to existing data center hosting facilities and attracted military clients, among others, to its Las Vegas shop.

Read more here.

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Microsoft braces for major customer shift to cloud computing

Posted in Data, Microsoft by Pankaj Gudimella on May 20, 2008

Microsoft sees tens of millions of corporate email accounts moving to its data centers over the next five years, shifting to a business model that may thin profit margins but generate more revenue. In an interview, Chris Capossela, who manages Microsoft’s Office products, said the company will see more and more companies abandon their own in-house computer systems and shift to “cloud computing,” a less expensive alternative. Cloud computing is the trend by Internet powerhouses to array huge numbers of computers in centralized data centers to deliver Web-based applications to far-flung users.

Read more here.

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